Link: St John Wonderworker – An Orthodox Church in America

http://blackandwhiteorthodoxy.wordpress.com

BLACK & WHITE – ORTHODOXY

static1.squarespace

static1.squarespace-1

http://saintjohnwonderworker.org

St John Wonderworker: An Orthodox Church in America

About Our Parish

Our parish is named after a modern saint, Saint John the Wonderworker, who was known for his great love for others, especially his love for orphanedchildren. St. John’s Troparion says that he gave hope to the hopeless, and giving hope is close to the heart of our parish. All of us need the hope that can only come from our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ. Through prayer and outreaches such as the Loaves and Fishes program which feeds the homeless, St. Nicholas Academy, our bookstore, our choir, and other ministries, we care for each other and the needy around us. Our parish is a loving, growing, Orthodox community where we strive together towards the greatest hope of all, heaven.

Our parish was named after St. John the Wonderworker, but has also been greatly impacted by our first priest, Father Jacob Myers who recently reposed. Under his leadership, Saint John’s has been a parish known for prayers, hospitality and ministry to others. Many converts have come into the faith and the parish continues to grow. The parish is actively involved in Pan Orthodox activities and ministries. Our parish has many converts to the faith as well as members from a variety of international backgrounds.

Saint John the Wonderworker Parish is the first church in the world named after Saint John (Maximovitch) of Shanghai and San Francisco. The parish is located in Atlanta, Georgia and joined the OCA as part of the Diocese of the South under Archbishop Dmitri of Dallas (now reposed) in September of 2000. Currently, we are under His Beatitude, The Most Blessed TIKHON, Archbishop of Washington, Metropolitan of All America and Canada and His Eminence, The Most Reverend NIKON, Archbishop of Boston, Locum Tenens of the Diocese of the South.

Services are held in English. We welcome visitors to stay for lunch after liturgy on Sundays.

Advertisements

The offering at the Divine Liturgy is more powerful than prayer – Saint John Maximovitch of San Francisco, CA, USA (+1966)

https://divineliturgyexperiences.wordpress.com

EXPERIENCES DURING THE DIVINE LITURGY

The offering at the Divine Liturgy is more powerful than prayer

╰⊰¸¸.•¨*

Saint John Maximovitch

of San Francisco, CA, USA (+1966)

Then, having successfully passed through the toll-houses and bowed down before God, the soul for the course of 37 more days visits the heavenly habitations and the abysses of hell, not knowing yet where it will remain, and only on the fortieth day is its place appointed until the resurrection of the dead. Some souls find themselves (after the forty days) in a condition of foretasting eternal joy and blessedness, and others in fear of the eternal torments which will come in full after the Last Judgment. Until then changes are possible in the condition of souls, especially through offering for them the Bloodless Sacrifice (commemoration at the Divine Liturgy), and likewise by other prayers.

How important commemoration at the Divine Liturgy is may be seen in the following occurrence: Before the uncovering of the relics of St. Theodosius of Chernigov (1896), the priest-monk (the renowned Starets Alexis of Goloseyevsky Hermitage, of the Kiev-Caves Lavra, who died in 1916) who was conducting the re-vesting of the relics, becoming weary while sitting by the relics, dozed off and saw before him the Saint, who told him: “I thank you for laboring with me. I beg you also, when you will serve the Divine Liturgy, to commemorate my parents” — and he gave their names (Priest Nikita and Maria). “How can you, O Saint, ask my prayers, when you yourself stand at the heavenly Throne and grant to people God’s mercy?” the priest-monk asked. “Yes, that is true,” replied St. Theodosius, “but the offering at the Divine Liturgy is more powerful than my prayer.”

+ St. John of Shanghai and San Francisco, Homily on Life after Death

Source:

http://www.orthodoxchurchquotes.com

http://www.orthodoxchurchquotes.com/2015/08/27/desert-fathers-a-dog-is-better-than-i-am/

ORTHODOX CHURCH QUOTES

Ancient Faith Radio: Saint John Maximovitch of Shanghai & San Francisco (+1966) – July 2

 

http://americaofmyheart.wordpress.com

AMERICA OF MY HEART

image

St_john_maximovitch_icon

Ancient Faith Radio:

Saint John Maximovitch of Shanghai & San Francisco (+1966)

July 2

This brightly-shining Saint of our own day was born in Russia in 1896. In 1921 his family fled the Russian Revolution to Serbia, where he became a monk and was ordained a priest. From the time of his entry into monastic life he adopted a severely ascetical way of life: for the rest of his life he never slept in a bed, sleeping only briefly in a chair or prostrated before the icons. He ate one meal a day, in the evening. Teaching seminarians in Serbia, he instructed them each day to devote six hours to divine services, six hours to prayer (not including the divine services!), six hours to good works, and six hours to rest (these six hours obviously included eating and bathing as well as sleeping). Whether his seminarians followed his counsels we do not know, but he himself not only followed but exceeded them.

In 1934 he was made Bishop of Shanghai (in the Russian Church Abroad), where he served not only the Russian émigré community but a number of native Chinese Orthodox; from time to time he served the Divine Liturgy in Chinese. When the Communists took power in China, he laboured tirelessly to evacuate his flock to safety, first to the Philippines, then to various western countries including the United States. He served as Bishop in Paris and Brussels, then, in 1962 was made Archbishop of San Francisco. Throughout his life as monk and hierarch he was revered (and sometimes condemned) for his ascetical labours and unceasing intercessions. During his life and ever since, numerous miraculous healings of all manner of afflictions have been accomplished through his prayers.

Once, in Shanghai, a caretaker, investigating strange noises in the cathedral after midnight, discovered Bishop John standing in the belltower, looking down on the city and praying for the people. Years later, when he visited Holy Trinity Monastery in Jordanville, New York, the priest responsible for hosting him found the saint walking through the halls of the monastery, standing outside the door of each room and praying for the monk or seminarian sleeping within. When the Archbishop had prayed outside each room, he returned to the beginning of his circuit and began praying again; and so he spent the entire night

Even as Archbishop, he lived in near-absolute poverty. His appearance was striking: His cassock was made of blue Chinese “peasant cloth,” crudely decorated with crosses stitched by orphans who had been in his care in Shanghai. His Bishop’s “miter” was often a cloth cap to which he had glued paper icons. Even in the United States, even while serving the Divine Liturgy (which he did every day), he went barefoot in all seasons. (Eventually, after he was hospitalized with an infected foot, his Metropolitan ordered him to wear shoes; thereafter, he wore sandals). Needless to say, he was an embarrassment to those who like their bishops to make a more worldly appearance, but among his various flocks throughout the world, there were always those who recognized him as a Saint in his own lifetime.

Following his repose in 1966, a steady stream of healings and other miracles was accomplished through his intercessions, and in 1996 he was glorified as a Saint of the Church. His incorrupt and wonder-working relics can be venerated at his cathedral in San Francisco. At St John’s funeral, the eulogist told his mourners (and all of us): because Archbishop John was able to live the spirituality of the Orthodox Church so fully, even in modern, western, urban society, we are without excuse

Footnote: An acquaintance of Monk John once met him on a train in Serbia. When asked his destination, Monk John replied, “I’m going to straighten out a mistake. I’ve gotten a letter meant for some other John whom they intend to make a bishop.” The same person met him again on his return journey and asked if he had been able to resolve his problem. John answered, “The mistake is much worse than I thought: they did make me a bishop.”

(From Ancient Faith Radio)

Source:

http://simplyorthodox.tumblr.com

SIMPLY ORTHODOX

 

“Although I have died, I am alive…” – Memories of St. John of Shanghai and San Francisco

http://saintsbook-orthodoxy.blogspot.com

SAINTS BOOK – ORTHODOXY

“Although I have died, I am alive…”

Memories of St. John of Shanghai and San Francisco

By Matthew Slavko

St. John (Maximovitch) of Shanghai and San Francisco said these words in appearing already after his death to one woman. But he came to many people, and he was always overflowing with life, quenching the thirst of many. Today it is especially appropriate to remember that St. John of Shanghai and San Francisco, the wonderworker, is our contemporary, having reposed only a little over half a century ago, in 1966—that is, quite recently. It is another clear witness to the unity of the Russian Orthodox world, inasmuch as St. John embraces and links Slobozhanschina (Sloboda, Ukraine, an historical region in modern-day northeast Ukraine and southwestern Chernozemie in Russia—ed.), Ukraine, China, Western Europe, and America by his life.

The Russian Orthodox Church Abroad glorified this wondrous God-pleaser among the saints on July 2, 1994. On June 24, 2008, St. John of Shanghai and San Francisco was glorified for Churchwide veneration by the Council of Bishops of the Russian Orthodox Church.

In Poltava, on July 2 of the same year, the first festive, conciliar Liturgy in honor of the newly-proclaimed saint was served. Touching were the words of the Continue reading ““Although I have died, I am alive…” – Memories of St. John of Shanghai and San Francisco”

Saint John Maximovitch & the dove

http://saintsofmyheart.wordpress.com

SAINTS OF MY HEART

Saint John Maximovitch & the Dove

When I came to San Francisco to be close to the saintly Archbishop John Maximovitch, I heard a lot of fascinating accounts of his ascetic life. Frequently I visited St. Tikhon’s Orphanage, founded by this Saint, and run then by his long-time assistant, Mrs. Maria Alexandrovna Shakhmatova (+1967). Archbishop John was a very busy man, and I did not dare to be often in his presence…

The orphanage was no longer a place where children were sheltered….Within its walls was Archbishop John’s tiny office, which was so small that even a bed would not fit, where he both lived and had his prayer-room and office…I would visit him there, and have long constructive talks that shaped my life.

One day I came to see Mrs. Shakhmatova, and she, as usual, insisted that I stay for tea, even though I never liked tea. She would get me into her kitchen, almost next to Archbishop John’s office, and ask, almost in the form of an interrogation, about my whereabouts, what I had done that week, what I had read, etc. Usually she scolded me for not visiting her more often Continue reading “Saint John Maximovitch & the dove”

Maria Tsalla of Pollux Band, Greece, 2007: A Personal miracle of Saint John Maximovitch of Shanghai and San Francisco (+1966)

http://cominghomeorthodoxy.wordpress.com

COMING HOME – ORTHODOXY


Maria Tsalla of Pollux Band, Greece, 2007:

A Personal miracle of Saint John Maximovitch

of Shanghai and San Francisco (+1966)

In 2007, when I was fifteen years old and had lost my father, my prayers each night hid a certain complaint, because God had taken my father so early, and even though I asked to see him at least in a dream, this desire of mine was not fulfilled.

God’s answer to my complaint was not long in coming; it came by way of a dream. In my dream, I was in a strange Church and was waitting in a line with other pilgrims. In front of me were children of various nationalities. As I waited at the end of this line, some people from the upper gallery motioned for me to go forward, and at these instructions the children obediently made way for me.

I found myself in front of an Icon depicting a Saint that I had never seen before. He was elderly and had a grey beard. As I gazed upon the Icon, the Saint stepped out of it like an apparition and told me to go to the right. Heading in the direction he had indicated to me, I saw a reliquary, out of which arose the same elderly man I had seen in the Icon. This time, however, he was not an apparition, painted in the colours used by Iconographers, but was flesh and blood.

I approached him, and we both sat down on the reliquary. He did not frighten me; I felt as if I were sitting with a friend on a bench and not with a Saint on a reliquary. He looked in my eyes with love and tenderness. His eyes emitted love and effection, and beautified his aged and bent body. Embracing me paternally, he spoke to me in a different language – not Greek or other languages that people speak. It was as if our souls were communicating. He told me that thenceforth he would be my father. His embrace filled my soul with calm and his fragrance made the dream real.

I woke up thinking about him, and with many questions as to who the elderly man was. Alongside the questions, however, I also had an answer to my question: “Do I have a father?”. Of course I did; I just did not know his name. I asked for help from my mother, who is a catechist and knows a great deal about Saints and their lives. None of those she mentioned, however, corresponded to the description I gave her. I only knew that he had a gray beard, was elderly, short, and bent, and, in any event, a foreigner, since the Church did not look Greek Orthodox, nor were the other pilgrims Greek, and he had not spoken to me in Greek.

My mother advised me to pray to him to reveal to my who he was. The answer to my prayer did not come through a dream this time, but rather through a birthday gift given to me by my spiritual Father (to whom I had never told the dream). I opened the gift and saw that it was a book. When I opened it, I saw the “strange” Church (“strange” to me, that is, because it was Russian) that I had seen in my dream, the Icon of the Saint, his reliquary, and the man himself! That is how I learned his name: St. John Maximovitch, the protector of orphans. Thus it was that I learned the name of my father – the father of all orphans, the afflicted, the weak, the poor, and the wronged. The Saint never leaves me, but is always near me and often appears in my dreams to give me support, consolation, and advice in difficult moments.

God took my [biological] father, but He also took care to send me an incorrupt one (the incorrupt Relics of the Saint are located in San Francisco), who is also on earth and who reminds us that whoever follows Christ has no reason to fear death.

I feel myself fortunate; but, at the same time, since God permitted such a thing to happen to me, the most sinful one, I have a responsibility to help as many people as possible learn about St. John Maximovitch, so that, just as I have been changed, he might also bring about a change for many other people who are reading these words now and who are searching for a place of refuge and a paternal embrace. The only thing I could do as a fifteen year old was to make a Facebook page called SAINT JOHN MAXIMOVITCH https://www.facebook.com/groups/211026374035/permalink/10151823170044036/, which today numbers more than 3,000 members. In the embrace he offered me,we all fit!

Maria Tsalla, Greece

https://www.facebook.com/groups/211026374035/permalink/10151823170044036/

Facebook of Maria Tsalla about St John Maximovitch

Saint John Maximovitch in the Netherlands

http://orthodox-heart.blogspot.com

ORTHODOX HEART

34249123484_9267c66ac7_b

St-Jean-J

ST JOHN MAXIMOVITCH IN THE NETHERLANDS

Archbishop John Maximovitch

By HEGOUMEN ADRIAAN

Netherlands Orthodox Church

Archbishop John is honored as the Founder of the Netherlands Orthodox Church, and the first Life of him to appear after his death was in the Dutch- language periodical of this Church (their article that follows appeared in the same issue).

Later, the major Life to date of Vladika (The Orthodox Word, Nov.-Dec., 1966) was translated in full into Dutch and printed in the same organ. The veneration and love of the Orthodox Dutch for Vladika was summed up in Bishop Jacob’s Foreword to their Life of him: “I have no spiritual father any more and shall indeed find no other, certainly not one like him, who from up in the middle of the night to say: Go to sleep now, what you are asking of God will certainly be all right. Vladika, thank you for everything, and Continue reading “Saint John Maximovitch in the Netherlands”